The Three Virtues

Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣat [5-2]
Brahmā/Prajāpati had three types of children – the gods, the humans and the demons. All three groups studied under their father. 
The gods asked Prajāpati, “Sir, Teach us.”
Prajāpati replied with a single letter, “da” and asked them, “Have you understood?”
The gods replied, “Yes, we have. da is dāmyata – have restraint.” Prajāpati agreed that they had. 
The humans asked Prajāpati, “Sir, Teach us.”
Prajāpati replied with a single letter, “da” and asked them, “Have you understood?”
The humans replied, “Yes, we have. da is datta- give.” Prajāpati agreed that they had. 
The demons asked Prajāpati, “Sir, Teach us.”
Prajāpati replied with a single letter, “da” and asked them, “Have you understood?”
The demons replied, “Yes, we have. da is dayadhvam- have compassion.” Prajāpati agreed that they had. 
The thunder in the sky goes “da da da” as if it were conveying this message to all of us: practise self-restraint, engage in charity and have compassion. 
The gods are the sense organs; humans are the mind and demons are emotions. What is needed for sense organs is restraint. What is needed for the mind is charity to overcome selfishness. What is needed for emotions is compassion to prevent them from going negative.
When the senses are in control, the mind is not craving and becomes generous, when emotions live in the background of compassion, one gains insight into oneself and gains a spiritual sight. That which cultivates a spiritual sight is a virtue.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s